U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs; National Institute of Justice The Research, Development, and Evaluation Agency of the U.S. Department of Justice U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice ProgramsNational Institute of JusticeThe Research, Development, and Evaluation Agency of the U.S. Department of Justice

Enhanced Situation Awareness for Forensic Labs ("Facebook for Forensics")

Kyle Usbeck, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center
NIJ Conference 2010
June 14-16

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Enhanced Situation Awareness for Forensic Labs ("Facebook for Forensics")

Kyle Usbeck, National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center
NIJ Conference 2010
June 14-16

Kyle Usbeck: So the codename for this project is really "Facebook for Forensics"; the idea here being we're trying to improve the communications between all the actors in a forensic science domain — so the crime scene investigators, the prosecutors, the evidence unit, the people collecting physical evidence. And once we improve the communication aspects, we're hoping to improve the DNA backlog reduction.

What we're finding through a lot of surveys and interviews is that communication is a huge bottleneck in the process of submitting examination requests and modifying those. So by improving the communication, we're hoping to also take away that bottleneck and alleviate the pressure at that bottleneck and improve the overall time for turnaround of these cases.

Basically, we're conducting an evaluation of an installation that we've done in West Palm Beach sheriff's office, and we're going to be evaluating the system there to see if the DNA backlog is actually being reduced.

It's a web-based implementation so any web browser, any computer, PDA, cell phone with a web browser is capable of rendering this system. And from that you can submit examination requests — you can look at the status of the request as it goes through the system.

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NIJ Conference
Interview
June 2010
Kyle Usbeck, Lead Software Engineer, Drakontas LLC.

NIJ Conference 2010 Highlights

Date created: May 04, 2010