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The 10-9 Project: Voice Activated Mobile Data Computers (MDCs)

Warren Harrison, Professor of Computer Science, Portland State University
NIJ Conference 2010
June 14-16

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The 10-9 Project: Voice Activated Mobile Data Computers (MDCs)

Warren Harrison, Professor of Computer Science, Portland State University
NIJ Conference 2010
June 14-16

Warren Harrison: The whole point of the 10-9 Project is to give officers access to their MDC when they're out of the car. So right now, you do a lot of your self-initiated activity through running plates and things like that. You typically do that through your MDC. Once you get out of the car though, you're limited to basically using your radio to talk to dispatch and, you know, that saturates the channel quite a bit if every time every officer in your district ends up calling in a plate that looks a little bit strange or whatever they want to find out something about.

So what we've done is we've developed a system that allows you to issue voice commands to a CAD application — a Computer-Aided Dispatch application — on your mobile data computer and have it take the message that come back from DMV and NCIC and LEDs and things like that, synthesize that, just those parts that you'd be most interested in, and run them back to you over your headset.

Here's an example right up here. This is a traffic detail I was involved with a while back. So, basically every year we have this festival out at one of our rivers, a kayaking festival, and our job normally on that day is to basically just get out of the car, park the car, put on the wigwags and start slowing traffic down.

In the past, cars would go by; they'd look a little bit fishy. You probably don't want to tie up dispatch, and you can't really get back to your car to run the plate to see if there's something that you should be concerned about. The last time we did this, I was able to use the MDC using voice commands to run plates as cars went by, picked up some suspended drivers, was able to radio ahead to some other cars to intercept them later on down the road. And they would've gotten by totally without using the headset.

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NIJ Conference
Interview
June 2010
Warren Harrison, Professor, Portland State University

NIJ Conference 2010 Highlights

Date created: August 18, 2010